“7000 Oaks”

It’s Tree Week here at blog central.

“I think the tree is an element of regeneration which in itself is a concept of time.” Joseph Beuys

Here are a couple of photos I took of part of Beuys’ piece, 7000 Oaks, right here in Manhattan (22nd Street between 10th and 11th Avenues).

[Sorry, the photos have gone missing.]

Tell me why you think trees are planted to memorialize people and win a piece of free art. For official rules, click here. DEADLINE August 14, 2010.


And Yet Another Chance to Win Art

This tree was dedicated by VCCA residents who were there on 9/11.
This tree was dedicated by VCCA residents who were there on 9/11/2001.

One quarter of A Life’s Work is about trees, and lately I’ve been thinking about why we use trees to memorialize.

I was going to write a post about it, but frankly, I’d rather read your thoughts on the matter. To encourage this, I’m offering more free art.

The rules: Tell me why humans use trees to memorialize people and events in a written essay, anywhere from 5 to 500 words. (UPDATE: this is suggested length. If you go long, that’s okay.) You can leave the essay as a comment here, or if you’re feeling shy, you can send it to my e-mail address ( d a v i d a t b l o o d o r a n g e f i l m s d o t c o m). Keep in mind that if you are one of those shy folks and your essay is selected as the winner, I will post it on the blog. If you’re not cool with this, please don’t enter.

Spelling and grammar count.

Entries must be submitted before 11:59 pm EDT August 14, 2010.

The person with the best essay receives an original work of art from me called sunray. Like the previous contest prizes, snowball and raindrops , sunray is conceptually very much in keeping with A Life’s Work’s themes. I will write something on a piece of tree-free hemp paper and put that paper in the sun, letting our friendly star transform the paper and the ink. I will document stages of this process and I will mail you the original piece of paper as well as the documentation (this will be a DVD).

Good luck!

The fine print:

The essay must be original. No plagiarism, please.

The decision of the judge (me, David Licata) is final.

The artist (me, David Licata) will retain the right to show the short film (sunray) at any venue and in any format now known or not yet developed, in perpetuity, throughout the universe. You, “the winner,” cannot screen sunray publicly for profit, nor can you sell the film in any form, nor transfer, upload, duplicate, or in any way disseminate it via  any mechanism now known or via future mechanisms currently unknown. Winner may not in any way alter the work without written consent from the artist (me, David Licata).

The Images of the Sounds of A Life’s Work

Last week I posted some sounds of A Life’s Work. Here now are the matching images.

Please remember that I was selecting sounds for the contest and wasn’t too concerned with the quality of the captured images, so if you see some flaws in the shots, a little unsteadiness or a focus issue, be forgiving.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGccuMo2LKk[/youtube]

Locations: Arcosanti, Cordes Junction, AZ; The Allen Telescope Array, Hat Creek, CA; Hyde Park Records, Chicago, IL; The Riley Digitization Center, Baylor University, Waco, TX; Interlochen, MI; Buckley, MI.

Another Chance to Win Art Is Over (But Another Chance Looms)

This contest is over: Cliff Garstang answered correctly. B. Look for another “Win Art” contest this summer.

I put together this little montage of sounds from A Life’s Work to share here, and then I thought, why not make it into another contest!

[audio:http://alifesworkmovie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/sounds-of-ALW_1-2.mp3]

I’m going to make this one easy.

If you play the above mp3, you will hear nine sounds from A Life’s Work. They are:

A) A grinder softening the edges of a Soleri brass bell;  bells blowing in the wind at Arcosanti; Optimus Prime transforming into a pickup truck; a room full of computers processing data; a bin of LPs being flipped through; a needle dropping on a 45; snow crunching under the weight of a man; Leatherface wielding his chainsaw; the wind.

B) A grinder softening the edges of a Soleri brass bell;  bells blowing in the wind at Arcosanti; radio telescopes positioning themselves at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) in Hat Creek, CA; a room full of SETI computers processing data; a bin of LPs being flipped through; a needle dropping on a 45; snow crunching under the weight of a man; a snowmobile; the wind.

C) A person using a stick shift for the first time;  bells blowing in the wind at Arcosanti; radio telescopes positioning themselves at the ATA in Hat Creek, CA; a room for SETI computers processing data; a bin of LPs being flipped through; a needle dropping on a 45; a man chewing aluminum foil; a snowmobile; the wind.

D) A grinder softening the edges of a Soleri brass bell; hubcaps on a cyclone fence rattling in a junkyard in Bayonne, NJ; radio telescopes positioning themselves at the ATA in Hat Creek, CA; my laundry room at 7:00pm on a Monday; a bin of LPs being flipped through; a needle dropping on a 45; snow crunching under the weight of a man; a snowmobile; the wind.

The first person that provides the correct answer receives an original work of art from me called raindrops. Like the previous contest prize, snowball (won by frequent commenter HB), raindrops is conceptually very much in keeping with A Life’s Work’s themes. Sometime after the date of this post I will write something on a piece of tree-free hemp paper and put that paper in the rain, letting the water transform the paper and the ink. I will let the paper dry completely without the aid of any mechanical device. I will document stages of this process and I will mail you the original piece of paper as well as the documentation (this may be a DVD video shot with my old, inexpensive, still camera or digital photos on a CD, I haven’t decided yet.)

Ready? Go!

The fine print:

The decision of the judge (me, David Licata) is final.

The artist (me, David Licata) will retain the right to show the short film (raindrops) at any venue and in any format now known or not yet developed, in perpetuity, throughout the universe. You, “the winner,” cannot screen raindrops publicly for profit, nor can you sell the film in any form, or in any way alter the work without written consent from the artist (me, David Licata).

We Have a Winner!

Congratulations to Haroon B. for correctly answering the four questions. He wins snowball, an original work of art and an accompanying film, both by me.

Here are the answers.

1. “The impossible just takes longer.”  David Milarch after the redwood expedition.
2. Frank Lloyd Wright liked the floor of Paolo Soleri’s Dome House.
3. Lawrence Kansas Centron Productions (Young America Films Presents) produced Why Study Home Economics.
4. Sweet Little Jesus Boy by Mahalia Jackson was the  album that captured the imagination of gospel music advocate Robert Darden when he was a child.

Win Art!

Answer these four questions and you win.

  1. Finish this quote from David Milarch: “The impossible ____ _____ ______.”
  2. According to Paolo Soleri, what did Frank Lloyd Wright like about Dome House?
  3. What company produced Why Study Home Economics?
  4. Robert Darden of the Black Gospel Music Restoration Project says: “I’m not sure, but I think this is the first gospel record I heard.” Name the artist and album.

The answers to these questions can be found in the clips of the film I’ve posted.

Be the first person to answer all four correctly in a comment ON THE BLOG (as opposed to a Facebook comment) and you win. “Win what?” you ask.

snowball

Sometime between the date of this post and March 15, I will make a snowball and bring it into my studio here at the MacDowell Colony and place it on a piece of tree-free hemp paper on which I will have written something. I will let the snowball transform into water and allow the water to transform the paper and the ink. I will let the paper dry completely without the aid of any mechanical device. I will document stages of this process and I will mail you the original piece of paper as well as the documentation (this may be a DVD video shot with my old, inexpensive, still camera or digital photos on a CD, I haven’t decided yet.)

This piece of art, which is conceptually very much in keeping with A Life’s Work’s themes, is six inches square and suitable for framing. I’ll sign it if you like.

The winner will be announced on the blog, unless she or he wishes to remain anonymous.

Good luck.

The fine print:

The decision of the judge (me, David Licata) is final.

The artist (me, David Licata) will retain the right to show the short film (snowball) at any venue and in any format now known or not yet developed, in perpetuity, throughout the universe. You, “the winner,” cannot screen the snowball publicly for profit, nor can you sell the video in any form, or in any way alter the work without written consent from the artist (me, David Licata).